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Rompun 2% w/v Solution for Injection:  Dosage and administration
 
 
Rompun 2% w/v Solution for Injection
Rompun 2% w/v Solution for Injection
Dosage and administration
Use two sterile needles, one to fill the syringe from the bottle and one to inject the patient. Once the required dose has been withdrawn from the vial, the syringe should be removed from the needle. A separate sterile needle should be inserted into the injection site and the syringe connected to it. The needles should be discarded into a closed container.
Syringes and needles must be sterile. Clean area of injection site and swab with spirit.
Cattle
Rompun is given by intramuscular injection. The dose rate is 0.05–0.3 mg/kg (0.25–1.5 ml per 100 kg) body weight, according to the degree of sedation required. Very fractious animals may require the higher dose rates, not exceeding 0.3 mg/kg (Dose rate 4)
Dose
mg/kg
mg/50 kg
ml/50 kg
1
0.05
2.5
0.12
2
0.10
5.0
0.25
3
0.20
10
0.50
4
0.30
15
0.75
Dose 1
Sedation, with a slight decrease of muscle tone. The ability to stand is maintained.
Dose 2
Sedation, marked decrease of muscle tone and some analgesia. The animal usually remains standing, but may lie down.
Dose 3
Deep sedation, further decrease of muscle tone and a degree of analgesia. The animal lies down.
Dose 4
Very deep sedation, a profound decrease in muscle tone and a degree of analgesia. The animal lies down.
Animals should not be disturbed until the drug has taken its full effect. The first effects are usually seen within 5 minutes of injection and the maximum effect is produced ten minutes later. There is no struggling or excitement during induction or recovery.
If the required depth of sedation is not achieved, it is unlikely that repetition of the dose will prove more effective. It is advisable to allow complete recovery, repeating the procedure with a higher dose after 24 hours.
When any surgical treatment is carried out using xylazine, additional local anaesthesia should be employed.
Horses
Administer by slow intravenous injection, taking from one to two minutes to administer. Dosage depends on the degree of sedation required and the response of the animal and is 0.6–1 mg/kg (3–5 ml/100 kg) body weight. Nervous or highly excitable horses generally require the higher dose. Experience has shown that older horses and those that have undergone severe exertion before treatment respond more readily to xylazine.
Depending on the dosage, light to deep sedation with individually variable analgesia is obtained. The horse does not become recumbent.
Animals should not be disturbed until the drug has taken its full effect. This is usually obtained within 5 minutes of intravenous injection and lasts for approximately 20 minutes.
If the required depth of sedation is not achieved, it is unlikely that repetition of the dose will prove more effective. It is advisable to allow complete recovery, repeating the procedure using Rompun Dry Substance, with a higher dose rate, after 24 hours.
For operations and painful procedures, additional local or regional anaesthesia should be used.
Rompun can also be administered to horses as a premedicant for operations on the recumbent animal using chloral hydrate, barbiturates, ketamine or halothane.
Cats
Administer intramuscularly at a dose rate of 3 mg/kg (0.15 ml/kg) body weight. The effect is adequate for procedures that are not associated with any considerable degree of pain. Premedication with atropine is advantageous. When used in conjunction with ketamine, xylazine premedication eliminates muscular stiffness during anaesthesia and maintains sedation throughout the recovery period.
Barbiturate anaesthesia should not be induced until sedation is at its deepest, i.e. about 20 minutes after administration of Rompun. Under these conditions the dose of barbiturates is reduced by about half.
Dogs
Administer by intramuscular injection at a dose rate of 1–3 mg/kg (0.05–0.15 ml/kg) body weight. Other routes of administration may be used, but the effect is less predictable. Good sedation is usually achieved at the lower end of the dose range given above, but excitable or vicious animals require a higher dose. The effect is adequate for procedures that are not associated with any considerable degree of pain. For painful procedures use in combination with a local anaesthetic. Premedication with atropine may be advantageous.
When used for pre-anaesthetic medication, xylazine reduces the dose required in the case of barbiturates by about half. Rompun can also be used as a premedicant for ketamine-induced anaesthesia.
Further Information Applicable to all Species
1.Analeptics will shorten the period or reduce the depth of sedation.
2.Limited information available suggests that alpha-2 blockers such as atipamezole may be effective in reversing the sedation and other physiological effects of the drug.
3.Transient hyperglycaemia is a common finding after xylazine sedation.
Use During Pregnancy and Lactation
Do not use in the latter stages of pregnancy except at parturition. As the safety of xylazine use during organogenesis has not been fully demonstrated by current methods it should be used with caution during the first month of pregnancy.
           
 
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  Date updated: 24 October 2012