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Further information
Care should be taken to avoid the following practices, because they increase the risk of development of resistance and could ultimately result in ineffective therapy:
- Too frequent and repeated use of anthelmintics from the same class, over an extended period of time;
- Under-dosing which may due to underestimation of bodyweight, misadministration of the product, or lack of calibration of the dosing device (if any).
- Suspected clinical cases of resistance to anthelmintics should be further investigated using appropriate tests (e.g. Faecal Egg Count Reduction Test). Where the results of the test(s) strongly suggest resistance to a particular anthelmintic, an anthelmintic belonging to another pharmacological class and having a different mode of action should be used.
For optimum control of bots, the product should be administered in the autumn, after the end of the fly season and before spring as the larvae may start to pupate and therefore are less sensitive to treatment.
Parasite resistance to a particular class of anthelmintic may develop following frequent, repeated use of an anthelmintic of that class.
The veterinary surgeon should give advice regarding appropriate dosing programmes and stock management to achieve adequate parasite control for both tapeworm and roundworm infestations.
In order to limit the impact of moxidectin on dung fauna, and due to insufficient data regarding environmental risk of praziquantel, horses should not be turned out onto pasture within 3 days of treatment.
In the case of cestode treatment the dose of praziquantel in the product has been selected at the top end of the dosing range.
Mouth pain, flaccid lower lip, ataxia, swelling of the muzzle, hypersensitivity and anorexia have been observed in rare (more than 1 but less than 10 animals in 10,000 animals treated) cases. Lethargy has been reported in very rare (less than 1 animal in 10,000 animals treated, including isolated reports) cases. These adverse effects are transient and disappear spontaneously. Transient adverse reactions may occur at the recommended dose in foals and at 3 times the recommended dose in adults. The symptoms are depression, inappetence, ataxia, flaccid lower lip in the 8 to 24 hours following treatment. Symptomatic treatment is not generally necessary and recovery is generally complete within 24 to 72 hours.
There is no specific antidote.
In case of very high worm burdens, destruction of the parasites may cause a mild transient colic and loose faeces in the treated horse.
Equest Pramox Oral Gel is specially formulated to be easily expelled by the syringe plunger. Once in the horse’s mouth, Equest Pramox Oral Gel liquefies. This facilitates dosing and reduces the risk of rejection.
Equest Pramox Oral Gel has been shown to be safe for use in breeding, pregnant and lactating mares. Administration does not adversely affect the fertility of mares.