metadata toggle
Pharmacological particulars
Pharmacodynamic properties
Milbemycin oxime belongs to the group of macrocyclic lactones, isolated from the fermentation of Streptomyces hygroscopicus var. aureolacrimosus. It is active against mites, against larval and adult stages of nematodes as well as against larvae of Dirofilaria immitis. The activity of milbemycin is related to its action on invertebrate neurotransmission: Milbemycin oxime, like avermectins and other milbemycins, increases nematode and insect membrane permeability to chloride ions via glutamate-gated chloride ion channels (related to vertebrate GABAA and glycine receptors). This leads to hyperpolarisation of the neuromuscular membrane and flaccid paralysis and death of the parasite.
Praziquantel is an acylated pyrazino-isoquinoline derivative. Praziquantel is active against cestodes and trematodes. It modifies the permeability for calcium (influx of Ca2+) in the membranes of the parasite inducing an imbalance in the membrane structures, leading to membrane depolarisation and almost instantaneous contraction of the musculature (tetany), rapid vacuolization of the syncytial tegument and subsequent tegumental disintegration (blebbing), resulting in easier expulsion from the gastrointestinal tract or death of the parasite.
Pharmacokinetic properties
After oral administration of praziquantel in the dog, peak serum levels of parent are rapidly attained (Tmax approximately 0.5-4 hours) and decline quickly (t1/2 approximately 1.5 hours); there is a substantial hepatic first-pass effect, with very rapid and almost complete hepatic biotransformation, principally to monohydroxylated (also some di- and tri-hydroxylated) derivatives, which are mostly glucuronide and/or sulfate conjugated before excretion. Plasma binding is about 80%. Excretion is fast and complete (about 90% in 2 days); the principal route of elimination is renal.
After oral administration of milbemycin oxime in dogs, peak plasma levels occur at about 2-4 hours, and decline with a half-life of the unmetabolised milbemycin oxime of 1-4 days. Bioavailability is about 80%.
In the rat, metabolism appears to be complete although slow, since unchanged milbemycin oxime has not been found in urine or feces. Main metabolites in the rat are monohydroxylated derivatives, attributable to hepatic biotransformation. In addition to relatively high liver concentrations, there is some concentration in fat, reflecting its lipophilicity